Joy Kogawa’s masterful third novel, a middle-aged woman discovers painful truths about her father

kogawa_rainIn Joy Kogawa’s masterful third novel, a middle-aged woman discovers that her father, a respected Anglican priest, has long been a sexual abuser of boys. Originally published to critical acclaim in 1995, The Rain Ascends has been revisited by the author, with substantive additions to the end of the narrative that bring to fruition the heroine’s struggle for forgiveness and redemption.

As a middle-aged mother, Millicent is confronted with the secrets of her father’s past as she recalls certain events in her childhood-a childhood that, on the surface, was a blissful one. Disbelief turns to confusion as she faces up to the sins of her father and wrestles with a legacy of lies, silence and her own embattled conscience.

In The Rain Ascends, Joy Kogawa beautifully sifts the truth from the past and the sinner from the perceived saint. The result is a sensitive, poetic, yet searing depiction of the wounds left by abuse and the redemption brought by truth.( Penguin)

Paperback: 240 pages
Publisher: Penguin Canada
Date Published: January 14, 2003
Subjects: Fiction
EAN: 9780143013xxx
Physical Dimensions: 5.50″ x 8.55″
Sales Rank: #

JOY KOGAWA was born in Vancouver in 1935 to Japanese- Canadian parents. During WWII,  Joy and her family were forced to move to Slocan, British Columbia, as part of the Canadian government’s policy to relocate and intern Japanese-Canadians. Kogawa is the author of several award-winning novels and volumes of poetry. In 1986, Kogawa was made a Member of the Order of Canada; in 2006, she was made a Member of the Order of British Columbia. She lives in Toronto.

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“Rain Ascends by Joy Kogawa.” Penguin Random House Canada. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 June 2015. < http://penguinrandomhouse.ca/books/390961/rain-ascends#9780143013204

Critical Parenting Lead to Anxiety or strict ‘Tiger Mothering’ is effective

Harsh, Critical Parenting May Lead to Anxiety Disorder Symptoms
“Tiger” parents may drive kids’ brains to overreact to errors


LYNNE CAMERON AP Photo

In an age when the formula for success seems infinitely regressive—when having a good career means going to a good college, which requires acing your way through a top high school, middle school and even preschool—the onus is on the parent to push, push, push. We want our children to get a foot in the door before they even know how to tie the shoe that’s on it. But should we encourage our children through tender praise, or do we embrace the “tiger mom” strategy of punishment and criticism?( Peck)

Does Science Support the Punitive Parenting of “Tiger Mothering”?

strict mother disciplining childPermanent Address: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/tiger-mother-punitive-parenting/
A law professor’s new memoir has stoked controversy because of its suggestion that a strict, authoritarian upbringing leads to academic success. But what does the scientific evidence say?

Are Chinese moms superior? That claim was suggested in a headline last week for a book excerpt in The Wall Street Journal by Yale University law professor and self-proclaimed “tiger mother” Amy Chua. It drew roars of anger from parenting experts and the Chinese-American community for its harsh parenting techniques, which included verbal denigrations and negative reinforcement, such as not permitting bathroom breaks or threats to destroy favorite toys until the child performed a musical composition flawlessly. The excerpt attracted numerous comments and responses such as “Parents like Amy Chua are the reason why Asian-Americans like me are in therapy.”

Access issue…SCIAM MIND May 2015…….https://my23.sd23.bc.ca/school/kss/staffroom/new/shareddocs/eread/Documents/SCIAM_MAY201506teenbrain.pdf
KSS Portal>Staff> Library>ereading> https://my23.sd23.bc.ca/school/kss/staffroom/new/shareddocs/eread/Pages/default.aspx

sd23\user.name
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Works Cited

Choi, C. (2011, January 18). Harsh, Critical Parenting May Lead to Anxiety Disorder Symptoms. Retrieved June 3, 2015, from http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/harsh-critical-parenting-may-lead-to-anxiety-disorder-symptoms/

Peck, M. (2015, April 9). Harsh, Critical Parenting May Lead to Anxiety Disorder Symptoms. Retrieved June 3, 2015, from http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/harsh-critical-parenting-may-lead-to-anxiety-disorder-symptoms/

AP Geography students deliver hope :-)

as the comments roll in from the non-fiction reading project, I’m profoundly impressed by the students’ responses. Clearly they are intelligent teens but also must have grasped comprehension from their studies with Mrs. Clarke. Terrific notes everyone. Remember to submit a reply to your a classmates comment. Assess their content and respond. Great job so far! 

  

Fact or Fiction?: A “Base Tan” Can Protect against Sunburn

Take heed my lovelies. Fair skin or not, protect your youthful skin with sunscreen, clothing, and exposure time.  Skin cancer sucks. -Al Smith

Fact or Fiction?: A “Base Tan” Can Protect against Sunburn
Studies of sunshine-denied human buttocks help settle the matter
By Dina Fine Maron | May 22, 2015 | 
  
As the weather warms, many of us would prefer to look like we passed our winter days lounging by the pool instead of hunched before a computer screen or lab bench. But soaking up the rays to acquire a so-called “base tan” does not fool the sun or a tanning bed. Simply put, the benefits of being sun-kissed are not even skin-deep.
Scientists came to this conclusion after studying the tanned buttocks of dozens of volunteers. In study after study they have found that a base tan affords almost no protection against future ultraviolet exposure. In fact, it actually puts otherwise pale people at risk of developing skin cancers. A base tan only provides an SPF, or sun protection factor, of 3 or less, according to the U.S. surgeon general. For beachgoers, that means if a person would normally turn pink after 10 minutes in the sun, an SPF 2 base tan would theoretically buy her another 10 minutes—or 20 minutes in total—before she burns. That, says David Leffell, the chief of dermatologic surgery and cutaneous oncology at Yale University School of Medicine, is “completely meaningless” in terms of providing protection.(Maron)

Read more…. Persistent URL: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/fact-or-fiction-a-base-tan-can-protect-against-sunburn/
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Works Cited

 Maron, Dina. “Fact or Fiction?: A “Base Tan” Can Protect against Sunburn.” Scientific American Global RSS. N.p., 22 May 2015. Web. 28 May 2015. <http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/fact-or-fiction-a-base-tan-can-protect-against-sunburn/&gt;.

 Shlabotnik, Joe. Sunscreen. Digital image. Flickr. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 May 2015. <https://www.flickr.com/photos/joeshlabotnik/782119885/sizes/m/in/photostream/&gt;.  Image Credit: Creative Commons/Flickr

welcome to bring your students down to the MPR so that they can check out local post-secondary opportunities. 

P1 and 2 (or all of your classes) to see what is offered by visiting the MPR during the lunch break. Thank you Career Centre

 KSS Opportunity Fair Thursday May 28, 2015

10:30am to 1:30pm MPR Day One P1,2,3,4

New Sci Amer mag articles now available

Check out these fascinating articles from Scientific America and SA Mind magazine.  access our print edition being circulated or read online anytime.

Access digital > https://my23.sd23.bc.ca/school/kss/staffroom/new/shareddocs/Pages/default.aspx

Sd23\user.name.  ########

In 1961 a child psychologist proposed a radical idea to the American Psychological Association: What if dogs could help therapists connect to troubled patients? Perhaps the animals would help soothe anxiety and help people open up. When Boris Levinson of Yeshiva University presented this idea, many of his colleagues thought it was laughable. Yet the idea that humans might derive therapeutic effects from animals would go on to capture the attention of many future researchers.
In recent years scientists have started investigating our attachment to creatures great and small. Although various types of pets and non-Western cultural dynamics remain largely unexplored, research has begun to examine how the animals that surround us affect our mood and mental states. New work has, for example, revealed how just thinking of a beloved pet may help us stay calm under pressure.(Sci Am. Mind)

http://www.scientificamerican.com/magazine/mind/

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientific-american-mind-explores-the-psychology-behind-keeping-pets/

  

The “teen brain” is often ridiculed as an oxymoron—an example of biology gone wrong. Neuroscientists have explained the risky, aggressive or just plain baffling behavior of teenagers as the product of a brain that is somehow compromised. Groundbreaking research in the past 10 years, however, shows that this view is wrong. The teen brain is not defective. It is not a half-baked adult brain, either. It has been forged by evolution to function differently from that of a child or an adult.(Gield)

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/risky-teen-behavior-is-driven-by-an-imbalance-in-brain-development/

  
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“Scientific American MIND Explores the Psychology Behind Keeping Pets.” Scientific American Global RSS. N.p., 15 May 2015. Web. 19 May 2015. <http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientific-american-mind-explores-the-psychology-behind-keeping-pets/&gt;.

Gield, Jay. “Risky Teen Behavior Is Driven by an Imbalance in Brain Development.” Scientific American Global RSS. N.p., 15 May 2015. Web. 19 May 2015. <http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/risky-teen-behavior-is-driven-by-an-imbalance-in-brain-development/&gt;.

SA MIND – new issue now available to KSSreads. it’s a dog’s breakfast…

C42AC643-DEE3-48B2-891E58F77E48D6BA

An overactive immune response can cause depression.
By the time she visited her doctor, Anne, a 28-year-old graduate student, had felt listless for months. Plagued by headaches, dizziness, anxiety and visual disturbances, she was struggling in her seminars and failed two exams. She also quit hobbies she enjoyed and stopped socializing. Her doctor diagnosed burnout, a depressive reaction to ongoing stress. He prescribed antidepressants and referred her to me for psychotherapy. Neither helped.(

Tapping the Expertise of Patients

Peer counselors are playing a growing role in guiding newcomers to mental health care
On a February day 15 years ago Paul Bradford took himself to a local emergency room. Bradford felt agitated and confused; he and his wife thought he needed professional help. To his surprise, two large men came into the waiting room, grabbed him by the arms and hustled him into a treatment room….

Scientific American MIND Explores the Psychology Behind Keeping Pets

Science helps us understand why we keep animal companions and how they became so prominent in our daily lives
In 1961 a child psychologist proposed a radical idea to the American Psychological Association: What if dogs could help therapists connect to troubled patients? Perhaps the animals would help soothe anxiety and help people open up. When Boris Levinson of Yeshiva University presented this idea, many of his colleagues thought it was laughable. Yet the idea that humans might derive therapeutic effects from animals would go on to capture the attention of many future researchers….

How to Be a Better Sleeper

Expert advice on lighting, timing and hacking your dreams
Everyone in my family is sleep-deprived. My wife, who usually writes this column, is so overtaxed this month that she asked me to fill in for her. It’s tempting to blame our sleep deprivation on nightly interruptions by our nine-month-old or our toddler. But it’s my own fault, too: like 30 percent of my fellow Americans, my sleep habits are fairly wretched. Instead of treating my sleep as a valuable resource, I approach bedtime like folding the laundry: as a regular obligation that I’ll get to, eventually….(Pavlus)
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Kasten, Eric. “Can Infection Give You the Blues?” Scientific American Global RSS. N.p., May-June 2015. Web. 13 May 2015. <http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/can-infection-give-you-the-blues/&gt;.

Pavlus, J. “How to Be a Better Sleeper.” Scientific American Global RSS. N.p., May-June 2015. Web. 13 May 2015. <http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-to-be-a-better-sleeper/&gt;.

“Scientific American MIND Explores the Psychology Behind Keeping Pets.” Scientific American Global RSS. N.p., May-June 2015. Web. 13 May 2015. <http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientific-american-mind-explores-the-psychology-behind-keeping-pets/&gt;.

Weintraub, Karen. “Tapping the Expertise of Patients.” Scientific American Global RSS. N.p., May-June 2015. Web. 13 May 2015. <http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/tapping-the-expertise-of-patients/&gt;.

Annual KSS dance show, entitled “Flow” – collaboration with GESS

Hello Friends!
Please accept our cordial invitation to the annual KSS dance show, entitled “Flow”. We are collaborating with George Elliot; performing at the Creekside Theatre, Thursday May 21st.  16 numbers, a variety of dance styles!!
Tickets are only $5 for students/seniors, and $7 for adults. Seating is limited
FLOWposterKSS2)

Summer wellness to my tired and amazing colleagues.

reflectiveteacher2014

From Positivity Big…
http://www.positivityblog.com/index.php/2014/06/26/take-care-of-yourself/
Thanks! Enjoy! Rest!

20140626-211229-76349593.jpg

1. Just watch the clouds go by.
Do only that, savor the moments of summer and feel how the inner tensions flow out of your mind and body.

2. Go phone- and internet-free for a time..
I recommend trying this one out, especially if you tend to spend a lot of time at work or in school with being online or talking on the phone.
Start with just staying away from your email and phone for maybe 24 hours. Then check them.

3. Appreciate what you did between New Year’s Eve and the start of this summer.
Half of 2014 has now gone by.
And there might have been some worries. Perhaps you were angry with yourself more than a few times during these 6 months. Or disappointed in what you did, didn’t do or what happened in your life.
When the stress…

View original post 272 more words

Kite Runner suspended after a complaint- removes freedom to read


http://www.citizen-times.com/story/news/local/2015/05/01/school-suspends-use-kite-runner-following-complaint/26736581/&nbsp;

As a librarian, it is always concerning to read about books being banned. The larger implications created when we narrow the opportunities to read, think, share and learn, are trouble for society. Diversity in our culture builds understanding. The diversity of ideas in books should be a reflection of our reality. Constricting access to ideas and authorship doesn’t protect our children but rather put them at risk. Loss of empathy, hate or radicalization  is a likely result. The current discord and misinformation about race and theology in the Muslem community is an example. We need more knowledge and empathy not less. Books, especially well crafted literature, like Hussein’s Kite Runner, provide potential for discourse and freedom of expression. 

Many classrooms around the world use the Kite Runner or provide copies in their libraries. Most schools use this title with Grade 12s. Like many situations, one needs to know your students, parent expectations and teaching context. Just banning books is an inferior way to handle content. 

Forcing every student in the class requires extra vigilance and planning. Like all literature? Parent opt-out seems a prudent option. A concern is that selections and management of interests and permissions could become a handicap. Small group reading and study certainly assists in the effort. Teacher due diligence and planning usually can manage concerns.

Book themes and storytelling have literary and student development merits. In the hands of professionals, like the classroom teacher and collaboration with the teacher-librarian, books provide powerful learning opportunities at any age.  When sensitive or somewhat disturbing content arises, hiding behind banning, only degrades empathy, insight and language skills. 


Using age appropriate material however troubling the content may appear, is just good teaching practice. People take children to movies that may be inappropriate. We trust parents judgement. We force students into textbooks, curriculum and programs, trusting the professionals to engage material wisely. Literature should be know different. 

-Smith, teacher-librarian 

  

http://www.mosaicbooks.ca/?q=h.tviewer&using_sb=status&qsb=keyword&qse=fL1Fm1B4rfGun9uouwyhAQ

Kss Cancer Campaign 

Hi Everyone, 

The Leadership students and the B.C Cancer Foundation have developed a website to make it easier for student that are shaving their heads to collect money.

If students are asking or you hear that a student is interested in shaving their head to raise money please point them in the direction of the website below.


http://donate.bccancerfoundation.com/KSS2015


Also check out various activities created by student leadership for this traditional KSS service event. 


Thank you for your help


http://kssrec.weebly.com/kss-cancer-golf-tournament.html