Search millions of historic photos from LIFE magazine.

Search millions of historic photos from LIFE magazine.

Search millions of photographs from the LIFE photo archive, stretching from the 1750s to today. Most were never published and are now available for the first time through the joint work of LIFE and Google.

Naturally Google has a 'Life' search engine and a strong directory-people, places, culture, etc. You can also search LIFE photos from any Google page with:

Add "source:life" to any Google image search and search only the LIFE photo archive. For some fun try: Academy Awards source:life http://images.google.com/images?q=Academy+Awards+source:life

“To see life; to see the world; to eyewitness great events; to watch the faces of the poor and the gestures of the proud; to see strange things – machines, armies, multitudes, shadows in the jungle and on the moon; to see man’s work – his paintings, towers and discoveries; to see things thousands of miles away, things hidden behind walls and within rooms, things dangerous to come to; the women that men love and many children; to see and to take pleasure in seeing; to see and be amazed; to see and be instructed.”- from Henry R. Luce’s prospectus for LIFE, 1936.
 

Life generally refers to three Americanmagazines:

  • A humor and general interest magazine published from 1883 to 1936. Time founder Henry Luce bought all rights to this magazine solely so that he could acquire the rights to its name.
  • A publication created by Henry Luce in 1936, with a strong emphasis on photojournalism. Life appeared as a weekly until 1972, as an intermittent "special" until 1978; and as a monthly from 1978 to 2000
  • A weekly newspaper supplement published by Time Inc. from 2004 to 2007 and included in some American newspapers.

LIFEcoverHems The Life founded in 1883 was similar to Puck and published for 53 years as a general-interest light entertainment magazine, heavy on illustrations, jokes and social commentary. It featured some of the greatest writers, editors and cartoonists of its era, including Charles Dana Gibson, Norman Rockwelland Harry Oliver. During its later years, this magazine offered brief capsule reviews (similar to those in The New Yorker) of plays and movies currently running in New York City, but with the innovative touch of a colored typographic bullet appended to each review, resembling a traffic light: green for a positive review, red for a negative one, amber for mixed notices.

The Luce Life was the first all-photographic American news magazine, and it dominated the market for more than 40 years. The magazine sold more than 13.5 million copies a week at one point and was so popular that President Harry S. Truman, Sir Winston Churchilland General Douglas MacArthurall serialized their memoirs in its pages.

Perhaps one of the best-known pictures printed in the magazine was Alfred Eisenstaedt’s photograph of a nurse in a sailor’s arms, snapped on August 27, 1945, as they celebrated VJ Dayin New York City. The magazine's place in the history of photojournalismis considered its most important contribution to publishing. Luce purchased the rights to the name from the publishers of the first Life but sold its subscription list and features to another magazine; there was no editorial continuity between the two publications.

Life was wildly successful for two generations before its prestige was diminished by economics and changing tastes. Since 1972, Life has twice ceased publication and resumed in a different form, before ceasing once again with the issue dated April 20, 2007. The brand name continues on the Internet( Wikipedia )

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