Our PBL Book 5: Khaled Hosseini

Book 5:

Khaled Hosseini – And the Mountains Echoed

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Author:Hosseini, Khaled
Adults Fiction-Award-Winner
Description:The best-selling author presents a story inspired by human love, how people take care of one another and how choices resonate through subsequent generations.

Genre:Adult books for young adults; Family sagas; Political fiction
Storyline:Character-driven; Intricately plotted
Tone:Dramatic; Heartwrenching; Strong sense of place
Writing Style:Lyrical
Persistent Link: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=neh&tg=UI&an=10176774&site=novp-live&scope=site

Publisher Weekly:

Hosseini’s third novel (after A Thousand Splendid Suns) follows a close-knit but oft-separated Afghan family through love, wars, and losses more painful than death. The story opens in 1952 in the village of Shadbagh, outside of Kabul, as a laborer, Kaboor, relates a haunting parable of triumph and loss to his son, Abdullah. The novel’s core, however, is the sale for adoption of the Kaboor’s three-year-old daughter, Pari, to the wealthy poet Nila Wahdati and her husband, Suleiman, by Pari’s step-uncle Nabi. The split is particularly difficult for Abdullah, who took care of his sister after their mother’s death. Once Suleiman has a stroke, Nila leaves him to Nabi’s care and takes Pari to live in Paris. Much later, during the U.S. occupation, the dying Nabi makes Markos, a Greek plastic surgeon now renting the Wahdati house, promise to find Pari and give her a letter containing the truth. The beautiful writing, full of universal truths of loss and identity, makes each section a jewel, even if the bigger picture, which eventually expands to include Pari’s life in France, sometimes feels disjointed. Still, Hosseini’s eye for detail and emotional geography makes this a haunting read. Agent: Robert Barnett, Williams & Connolly. (May) –Staff (Reviewed March 18, 2013) (Publishers Weekly, vol 260, issue 11, p)

Reader Review:

…With heart-breaking realism, Hosseini tells the tale of a family split apart by poverty and desperation. From the small rural villages to the large bustling cities of Afghanistan, the writing transports the reader into the heart of the story, experiencing the sounds, the smells and the changing political landscapes. From immense poverty, to the greatest riches. From the modest and humble, to the arrogant and the proud, the cast of characters are a triumph.

That one event in Kabul in 1952 leads on to many others, including characters and settings from Paris, to the Greek Islands and back to Afghanistan. Characters who appear, on the face of it, to be so different and so diverse are all connected in one way or another to the day that a loving father told his two small children the story of farmer Baba Ayub – it is this story, and its meaning that is threaded through the whole novel and which eventually turns from a fable to the truth… (Goodreads)

Interview: http://youtu.be/6EKyM6B2GrA

Audiobook: http://youtu.be/3qISCJHVvSs

AND THE MOUNTAINS ECHOED is an unforgettable novel about finding a lost piece of yourself in someone else.

Khaled Hosseini, the #1 New York Times–bestselling author of The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns, has written a new novel about how we love, how we take care of one another, and how the choices we make resonate through generations. In this tale revolving around not just parents and children but brothers and sisters, cousins and caretakers, Hosseini explores the many ways in which families nurture, wound, betray, honor, and sacrifice for one another; and how often we are surprised by the actions of those closest to us, at the times that matter most. Following its characters and the ramifications of their lives and choices and loves around the globe—from Kabul to Paris to San Francisco to the Greek island of Tinos—the story expands gradually outward, becoming more emotionally complex and powerful with each turning page.
Author interview:

About Author:

Hosseini was born in Kabul, Afghanistan, in 1965. In 1970 Hosseini and his family moved to Iran where his father worked for the Embassy of Afghanistan in Tehran. In 1973 Hosseini’s family returned to Kabul, and Hosseini’s youngest brother was born in July of that year.
In 1976, when Hosseini was 11 years old, Hosseini’s father obtained a job in Paris, France, and moved the family there. They were unable to return to Afghanistan because of the Saur Revolution in which the PDPA communist party seized power through a bloody coup in April 1978. Instead, a year after the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, in 1980 they sought political asylum in the United States and made their residence in San Jose, California.
Hosseini graduated from Independence High School in San Jose in 1984 and enrolled at Santa Clara University, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in biology in 1988. The following year, he entered the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, where he earned his M.D. in 1993. He completed his residency in internal medicine at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles in 1996. He practiced medicine for over ten years, until a year and a half after the release of The Kite Runner.
Hosseini is currently a Goodwill Envoy for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). He has been working to provide humanitarian assistance in Afghanistan through the Khaled Hosseini Foundation. The concept for the foundation was inspired by the trip to Afghanistan that Hosseini made in 2007 with UNHCR.
He lives in Northern California with his wife, Roya, and their two children (Harris and Farah). ( Goodreads)

One thought on “Our PBL Book 5: Khaled Hosseini

  1. More….

    A story of love, separation, friendship, compassion, exile, memory and the troubled history of Afghanistan, spanning three continents and 60 years… Hosseini is a master storyteller and his characters brim with life… This novel will not disappoint his many admirers — Paul Dunn The Times

    Hosseini’s evocative tales don’t just capture hearts, they break them Glamour I defy any critics less high-minded than, say, F.R. Leavis not to enjoy the sheer zest with which Hosseini goes about his business here – or admire the unhurried confidence with which he sweeps through the years. And if they do admit that resistance is futile and allow their heartstrings to be shamelessly tugged, they might spot something else as well: in its admittedly unsubtle way, the novel gives a thorough airing to the central question of whether it’s better to stay true to your roots or rise above them … Let’s face it, Hosseini is a master storyteller — James Walton Spectator

    And the Mountains Echoed charges its readers for the emotional particles they are, giving them what they want with a narrative facility as great as any blockbusting author alive — Alexander Linklater Observer

    This is a shamelessly enjoyable book — Philip Hensher Guardian

    He brings a real, human Afghanistan to life in a way that endless news stories about bombs and the Taliban can’t … The mountains echo with the voices and events from the past and the ripples extend outwards beyond the final page — Luisa Metcalfe Daily Express

    I read And the Mountains Echoed in a single sitting – it is an absorbing read from a master storyteller Financial Times An exquisitely rendered study of familial bonds … And the Mountains Echoed moves deftly between generations and countries … The novel is a dizzying array of voices and places that allows the reader to luxuriate in Hosseini’s rich, textured language. Hosseini is a masterful storyteller Literary Review

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