New Sci Amer mag articles now available

Check out these fascinating articles from Scientific America and SA Mind magazine.  access our print edition being circulated or read online anytime.

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In 1961 a child psychologist proposed a radical idea to the American Psychological Association: What if dogs could help therapists connect to troubled patients? Perhaps the animals would help soothe anxiety and help people open up. When Boris Levinson of Yeshiva University presented this idea, many of his colleagues thought it was laughable. Yet the idea that humans might derive therapeutic effects from animals would go on to capture the attention of many future researchers.
In recent years scientists have started investigating our attachment to creatures great and small. Although various types of pets and non-Western cultural dynamics remain largely unexplored, research has begun to examine how the animals that surround us affect our mood and mental states. New work has, for example, revealed how just thinking of a beloved pet may help us stay calm under pressure.(Sci Am. Mind)

http://www.scientificamerican.com/magazine/mind/

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientific-american-mind-explores-the-psychology-behind-keeping-pets/

  

The “teen brain” is often ridiculed as an oxymoron—an example of biology gone wrong. Neuroscientists have explained the risky, aggressive or just plain baffling behavior of teenagers as the product of a brain that is somehow compromised. Groundbreaking research in the past 10 years, however, shows that this view is wrong. The teen brain is not defective. It is not a half-baked adult brain, either. It has been forged by evolution to function differently from that of a child or an adult.(Gield)

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/risky-teen-behavior-is-driven-by-an-imbalance-in-brain-development/

  
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“Scientific American MIND Explores the Psychology Behind Keeping Pets.” Scientific American Global RSS. N.p., 15 May 2015. Web. 19 May 2015. <http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientific-american-mind-explores-the-psychology-behind-keeping-pets/&gt;.

Gield, Jay. “Risky Teen Behavior Is Driven by an Imbalance in Brain Development.” Scientific American Global RSS. N.p., 15 May 2015. Web. 19 May 2015. <http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/risky-teen-behavior-is-driven-by-an-imbalance-in-brain-development/&gt;.

SA MIND – new issue now available to KSSreads. it’s a dog’s breakfast…

C42AC643-DEE3-48B2-891E58F77E48D6BA

An overactive immune response can cause depression.
By the time she visited her doctor, Anne, a 28-year-old graduate student, had felt listless for months. Plagued by headaches, dizziness, anxiety and visual disturbances, she was struggling in her seminars and failed two exams. She also quit hobbies she enjoyed and stopped socializing. Her doctor diagnosed burnout, a depressive reaction to ongoing stress. He prescribed antidepressants and referred her to me for psychotherapy. Neither helped.(

Tapping the Expertise of Patients

Peer counselors are playing a growing role in guiding newcomers to mental health care
On a February day 15 years ago Paul Bradford took himself to a local emergency room. Bradford felt agitated and confused; he and his wife thought he needed professional help. To his surprise, two large men came into the waiting room, grabbed him by the arms and hustled him into a treatment room….

Scientific American MIND Explores the Psychology Behind Keeping Pets

Science helps us understand why we keep animal companions and how they became so prominent in our daily lives
In 1961 a child psychologist proposed a radical idea to the American Psychological Association: What if dogs could help therapists connect to troubled patients? Perhaps the animals would help soothe anxiety and help people open up. When Boris Levinson of Yeshiva University presented this idea, many of his colleagues thought it was laughable. Yet the idea that humans might derive therapeutic effects from animals would go on to capture the attention of many future researchers….

How to Be a Better Sleeper

Expert advice on lighting, timing and hacking your dreams
Everyone in my family is sleep-deprived. My wife, who usually writes this column, is so overtaxed this month that she asked me to fill in for her. It’s tempting to blame our sleep deprivation on nightly interruptions by our nine-month-old or our toddler. But it’s my own fault, too: like 30 percent of my fellow Americans, my sleep habits are fairly wretched. Instead of treating my sleep as a valuable resource, I approach bedtime like folding the laundry: as a regular obligation that I’ll get to, eventually….(Pavlus)
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Kasten, Eric. “Can Infection Give You the Blues?” Scientific American Global RSS. N.p., May-June 2015. Web. 13 May 2015. <http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/can-infection-give-you-the-blues/&gt;.

Pavlus, J. “How to Be a Better Sleeper.” Scientific American Global RSS. N.p., May-June 2015. Web. 13 May 2015. <http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-to-be-a-better-sleeper/&gt;.

“Scientific American MIND Explores the Psychology Behind Keeping Pets.” Scientific American Global RSS. N.p., May-June 2015. Web. 13 May 2015. <http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientific-american-mind-explores-the-psychology-behind-keeping-pets/&gt;.

Weintraub, Karen. “Tapping the Expertise of Patients.” Scientific American Global RSS. N.p., May-June 2015. Web. 13 May 2015. <http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/tapping-the-expertise-of-patients/&gt;.

Will Heavy Drinking Really Cause Forgetfulness…SCIAM

Will Heavy Drinking Really Cause Forgetfulness?

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/will-heavy-drinking-really-cause-forgetfulness/

Charles F. Zorumski, head of the department of psychiatry at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, answers:

It is indeed possible for a person to get intoxicated and not remember what she or he did. This state is called a “blackout” or, more precisely, a “memory blackout.” During a blackout a person is intoxicated but awake and interacting with the environment in seemingly meaningful ways, such as holding a conversation or driving a car. After the period of intoxication, usually the next day, the person has no or, at best, vague recall for events that occurred while inebriated. At times, being in this state can have disastrous consequences, such as waking up in an unknown or unsafe place, losing personal possessions or participating in risky behaviors.
On the neural level, a blackout is a period of anterograde amnesia.( Ng )

This article was originally published with the title “Is it possible to get so inebriated that you don’t remember your actions?.”

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Ng, Eliene. “SA Mind – Scientific American.” Scientific American MIND. Scientific American, 12 Feb. 2015. Web. 25 Feb. 2015. <http://www.scientificamerican.com/magazine/mind/&gt;.

Textbooks evolve ebooks more interactive

http://www.sciamdigital.com/index.cfm?fa=Products.DownloadIssue

Textbooks Come Alive

Next-generation science e-books may help keep young people engaged
Science can advance quickly, rendering existing textbooks obsolete. Now new digital textbooks are emerging intended to better engage students and keep them up-to-date on the latest research.

These e-books will cost (and weigh) less than the average printed tome. In January, Apple announced its iBooks 2 textbook platform for the iPad, and publishers, including McGraw-Hill, Pearson, and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, have signed on to create content for it. In February, Nature Publishing Group, of which Scientific American is a part, came out with Principles of Biology, an interactive, multimedia “book” intended for university-level introductory biology classes that is accessible online using tablet computers, laptops, desktops and smartphones. Principles of Biology integrates text with videos, simulations, interactive exercises, illustrations and tests and also includes classic and current papers from Nature and related journals. Future titles in the life and physical sciences are in the works.

Marine ecologist David Johnston of Duke University and his colleagues have taken a more Wikipedia-like approach. Their app, Cachalot, is available for free on the iPad and was created with the help of volunteers: marine scientists wrote it without charge from lecture notes, a computer science class designed it, and institutions, including the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, donated images and video. The project grew out
of a class of Johnston’s that focuses on large marine animals such as dolphins, turtles, seals and giant tube worms. Although writers are not paid for their contributions, their work does get peer-reviewed and published, thus making it potentially valuable when it comes time for promotion or tenure, he says.
Sharon Lynch, a science education researcher at George Washington University, says e-books such as these may eventually become mainstream but adds that research needs to be done on whether or not they are actually better than traditional textbooks. One such study is already under way at Nature Publishing Group: on some California State University campuses, students began biology on old textbooks, whereas other classes came in with Principles of Biology, so the company is doing side-by-side comparisons of how well students learned biology and how their attitudes toward science might differ, says Vikram Savkar, publishing director of Nature Education.

Entire digital issue now available. I drive/handouts/library resources/eread/sciam/